Wildlife Collective
Wildlife Collective is a blog created by Marta, a twenty-three year old wildlife conservation/zoology enthusiast. This blog was created for purpose of sharing photos and information about some of the most beautiful creatures that we share our planet with.

A big thank you to my dear friend James for making my banner for me!
South American Coati (also known as the Ring-Tailed Coati)Nasua nasua
The South American coat is native to Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Columbia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Surinam, Uruguay and Venezuela. It is the southern replacement of its very similar cousin, the white-nosed coati. South American coatis are diurnal animals, and they live both on the ground and in trees. They typically live in the forest. They are omnivorous and primarily eat fruit, invertebrates, other small animals and bird’s eggs. Coatis search for fruit in trees high in the canopy, and use their snouts to poke through crevices to find animal prey on the ground. They also search for animal prey by turning over rocks on the ground or ripping open logs with their claws.Females generally live in large groups, called bands, consisting of 15 to 30 animals. Males, on the other hand, are usually solitary. 
Facts | Photo © Jochen Luebke

South American Coati (also known as the Ring-Tailed Coati)
Nasua nasua

The South American coat is native to Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Columbia, Ecuador, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Surinam, Uruguay and Venezuela. It is the southern replacement of its very similar cousin, the white-nosed coati. 
South American coatis are diurnal animals, and they live both on the ground and in trees. They typically live in the forest. They are omnivorous and primarily eat fruit, invertebrates, other small animals and bird’s eggs. Coatis search for fruit in trees high in the canopy, and use their snouts to poke through crevices to find animal prey on the ground. They also search for animal prey by turning over rocks on the ground or ripping open logs with their claws.
Females generally live in large groups, called bands, consisting of 15 to 30 animals. Males, on the other hand, are usually solitary. 

Facts | Photo © Jochen Luebke

  1. dreamscanttaketheplaceoflovinyou reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  2. officialsaruhiko reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  3. ody-ssea reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  4. hyenaqueena reblogged this from ughrome and added:
  5. glace-ion reblogged this from ughrome
  6. ingosdubvoice reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  7. codexana reblogged this from actualgaysatan and added:
    Must. Make. Fursuit.
  8. daydreamering reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  9. wildlifecollective posted this