Wildlife Collective
Wildlife Collective is a blog created by Marta, a twenty-three year old wildlife conservation/zoology enthusiast. This blog was created for purpose of sharing photos and information about some of the most beautiful creatures that we share our planet with.

A big thank you to my dear friend James for making my banner for me!
Przewalski’s HorseEquus caballus przewalskiiPrzewalski’s horses are the last surviving subspecies of wild horse. First described scientifically in the late 19th century by Russian explorer N.M. Przewalski, for whom the horse is named, the horse once freely roamed the steppe along the Mongolia-China border. Never again seen in the wild, Przewalski’s horses have since been kept and bred in captivity and have recently been reintroduced in Mongolia. Considered a wild subspecies because its ancestors were never domesticated, the extinction in the wild of the Przewalski’s horse was due primarily to interbreeding with other domesticated horses. About 1,500 exist today, a large number living in zoos, but many also making up herds that have been reintroduced at several sites in Mongolia. While their greatest threats today include loss of genetic diversity, their extinction in the wild was also brought on by hunting, loss of habitat, and loss of water sources to domestic animals. Facts and photo

Przewalski’s Horse
Equus caballus przewalskii

Przewalski’s horses are the last surviving subspecies of wild horse. First described scientifically in the late 19th century by Russian explorer N.M. Przewalski, for whom the horse is named, the horse once freely roamed the steppe along the Mongolia-China border. Never again seen in the wild, Przewalski’s horses have since been kept and bred in captivity and have recently been reintroduced in Mongolia. Considered a wild subspecies because its ancestors were never domesticated, the extinction in the wild of the Przewalski’s horse was due primarily to interbreeding with other domesticated horses. About 1,500 exist today, a large number living in zoos, but many also making up herds that have been reintroduced at several sites in Mongolia. While their greatest threats today include loss of genetic diversity, their extinction in the wild was also brought on by hunting, loss of habitat, and loss of water sources to domestic animals.

Facts and photo

  1. yatahuahua reblogged this from kuroothotsurou
  2. kuroothotsurou reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  3. jauntygold reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  4. fictionalistic reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  5. wildlifecollective posted this