Wildlife Collective
Wildlife Collective is a blog created by Marta, a twenty-three year old wildlife conservation/zoology enthusiast. This blog was created for purpose of sharing photos and information about some of the most beautiful creatures that we share our planet with.

A big thank you to my dear friend James for making my banner for me!
Marine IguanaAmblyrhynchus cristatusThe much-maligned marine iguanas of the Galapagos Islands are so famously homey, even Charles Darwin piled on, describing them as “hideous-looking” and “most disgusting, clumsy lizards.”It’s true, they’re not pretty, with their wide-set eyes, smashed-in faces, spiky dorsal scales, and knotty, salt-encrusted heads. But what these unusual creatures lack in looks they make up for with their amazing and unique ecological adaptations.Scientists figure that land-dwelling iguanas from South America must have drifted out to sea millions of years ago on logs or other debris, eventually landing on the Galapagos. From that species emerged marine iguanas, which spread to nearly all the islands of the archipelago. Each island hosts marine iguanas of unique size, shape and color.They look fierce, but are actually gentle herbivores, surviving exclusively on underwater algae and seaweed. Their short, blunt snouts and small, razor-sharp teeth help them scrape the algae off rocks, and their laterally flattened tails let them move crocodile-like through the water. Their claws are long and sharp for clinging to rocks on shore or underwater in heavy currents. They have dark gray coloring to better absorb sunlight after their forays into the frigid Galapagos waters. And they even have special glands that clean their blood of extra salt, which they ingest while feeding.Their population is not well known, but estimates are in the hundreds of thousands. They are under constant pressure from non-native predators like rats, feral cats, and dogs, who feed on their eggs and young. They are protected throughout the archipelago and are considered vulnerable to extinction.Facts | Photo © Rob Stewart 

Marine Iguana
Amblyrhynchus cristatus

The much-maligned marine iguanas of the Galapagos Islands are so famously homey, even Charles Darwin piled on, describing them as “hideous-looking” and “most disgusting, clumsy lizards.”
It’s true, they’re not pretty, with their wide-set eyes, smashed-in faces, spiky dorsal scales, and knotty, salt-encrusted heads. But what these unusual creatures lack in looks they make up for with their amazing and unique ecological adaptations.
Scientists figure that land-dwelling iguanas from South America must have drifted out to sea millions of years ago on logs or other debris, eventually landing on the Galapagos. From that species emerged marine iguanas, which spread to nearly all the islands of the archipelago. Each island hosts marine iguanas of unique size, shape and color.
They look fierce, but are actually gentle herbivores, surviving exclusively on underwater algae and seaweed. Their short, blunt snouts and small, razor-sharp teeth help them scrape the algae off rocks, and their laterally flattened tails let them move crocodile-like through the water. Their claws are long and sharp for clinging to rocks on shore or underwater in heavy currents. They have dark gray coloring to better absorb sunlight after their forays into the frigid Galapagos waters. And they even have special glands that clean their blood of extra salt, which they ingest while feeding.
Their population is not well known, but estimates are in the hundreds of thousands. They are under constant pressure from non-native predators like rats, feral cats, and dogs, who feed on their eggs and young. They are protected throughout the archipelago and are considered vulnerable to extinction.

Facts | Photo © Rob Stewart 

  1. webherps reblogged this from kelology
  2. concentratedridiculousness reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  3. selfiezona reblogged this from wildlifecollective and added:
    be mine
  4. thingofbeauty reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  5. moreanimalia reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  6. wigmund reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  7. yafeelmeman reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  8. urvogel reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  9. kelology reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  10. ifitwasnttruenowitis reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  11. seabell reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  12. opakakaek reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  13. lesbianslovefish reblogged this from wildlifecollective and added:
    I have the weirdest boner right now
  14. terravox reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  15. queenofmia reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  16. rainbowhouseplant reblogged this from rhamphotheca and added:
    he’s beautiful
  17. roseravenclaw reblogged this from rhamphotheca
  18. rhamphotheca reblogged this from wildlifecollective and added:
    Marine Iguana
  19. wildlifecollective posted this