Wildlife Collective
Wildlife Collective is a blog created by Marta, a twenty-three year old wildlife conservation/zoology enthusiast. This blog was created for purpose of sharing photos and information about some of the most beautiful creatures that we share our planet with.

A big thank you to my dear friend James for making my banner for me!
Blue TitCyanistes caeruleus or Parus caeruleus The Blue Tit is a 10.5-12cm long passerine bird in the tit family Paridae. It is a widespread and common resident breeder throughout temperate and subarctic Europe and western Asia in deciduous or mixed woodlands. It is a resident bird; i.e., most tits do not migrate. This is a common and popular European garden bird, due to its perky acrobatic performances when feeding on nuts or suet. It swings beneath the holder, calling “tee, tee, tee” or a scolding “churr”. The song period lasts almost all the year around, but is most often heard during February to June. Blue tits are able to culturally transmit learning to other Tit species. An example of this, dating from the 1920s, is the ability to open milk bottles with foil tops, to get at the cream underneath. Such behavior has been suppressed recently by the gradual change of human dietary habits (low-fat or skimmed milk instead of full-fat), and the way of getting them (from a supermarket instead of the milkman). Facts | Photo © Tony Yeomans

Blue Tit
Cyanistes caeruleus or Parus caeruleus 

The Blue Tit is a 10.5-12cm long passerine bird in the tit family Paridae. It is a widespread and common resident breeder throughout temperate and subarctic Europe and western Asia in deciduous or mixed woodlands. It is a resident bird; i.e., most tits do not migrate. 
This is a common and popular European garden bird, due to its perky acrobatic performances when feeding on nuts or suet. It swings beneath the holder, calling “tee, tee, tee” or a scolding “churr”. 
The song period lasts almost all the year around, but is most often heard during February to June.
Blue tits are able to culturally transmit learning to other Tit species. An example of this, dating from the 1920s, is the ability to open milk bottles with foil tops, to get at the cream underneath. Such behavior has been suppressed recently by the gradual change of human dietary habits (low-fat or skimmed milk instead of full-fat), and the way of getting them (from a supermarket instead of the milkman).

Facts | Photo © Tony Yeomans

  1. allisplenitude reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  2. shawnpboyle reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  3. floralfilth reblogged this from wildlifecollective
  4. wildlifecollective posted this